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Thursday, April 23, 2020 | History

4 edition of An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa and Chippewa of Northern Ohio found in the catalog.

An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa and Chippewa of Northern Ohio

Erminie Wheeler Voegelin

An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa and Chippewa of Northern Ohio

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Published by Garland Pub in New York, NY .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of North America -- Ohio.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesIndians of northwest Ohio
    StatementErminie Wheeler-Voegelin.
    SeriesAmerican Indian ethnohistory : North central and northeastern Indians
    ContributionsUnited States. Indian Claims Commission
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE"78"O3"V63
    The Physical Object
    Pagination373 p. :
    Number of Pages373
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21119484M
    ISBN 100824007999
    LC Control Number74-2387

    Ojibwe / oʊ ˈ dʒ iː b w eɪ / (Ojibwa, Ojibway), also known as Chippewa or Otchipwe, is a North American indigenous language of the Algonquian languages family. Ojibwe is characterized by a series of dialects that have local names and frequently local writing is no single dialect that is considered the most prestigious or most prominent, and no standard writing Ethnicity: Ojibwe people.


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An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa and Chippewa of Northern Ohio by Erminie Wheeler Voegelin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Catalog An ethnohistorical report » Book» An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa, and Chippewa of northwest Ohio (Book) Average Rating. Author: Wheeler-Voegelin, Erminie, Contributors:.

An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa, and Chippewa of northwest Ohio on *FREE* shipping on qualifying cturer: Garland Pub. Inc. An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa, and Chippewa of northwest Ohio / Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin.

Series Title: American Indian ethnohistory: North central and northeastern Indians. An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa, and Chippewa of northwest Ohio / [by] Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin Wheeler-Voegelin, Erminie, [ Book: ].

Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, An ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa, and Chippewa of northwest Ohio (New York, ), Ludwig Kosche, “Relics of Brock: an investigation,” Archivaria (Ottawa), no.9 (winter –80): 33– Inthe Ottawa -- along with the Chippewa, Wyandot, and Potawatomi -- were involved in the signing of the Treaty of Detroit, which gave up large swathes of American Indian territory in Southeastern Michigan and Northwestern Ohio to the U.S.

Government. Inthe United States forced the Ottawa to give up their few remaining lands in Ohio. A treaty between the United States and the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot and Potawatomi Native American nations. The treaty was signed at Detroit, Michigan on Novemwith William Hull, governor of the Michigan Territory and superintendent of Indian affairs the sole representative of the U.S.

Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, “Ethnohistory of Indian use and occupancy in Ohio and Indiana prior to ,” Indians of Ohio prior to (2v., New York and London, ), 2:; Indians of northwest Ohio; an ethnohistorical report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa and Chippewa of northwest Ohio (New York and London, ),B.

The Wyandot Removal from Ohio. In Congress passed the Indian Removal Act under the direction of President Andrew Jackson. That act empowered the federal government to forcibly remove all Native Americans. All of the other Nations in Ohio had negotiated with the government to leave Ohio for lands west of the Mississippi, except for the Wyandot.

Portrait of Bill Moose Crowfoot in head dress and beaded tunic, He is regarded to have been the last of the Wyandot people who lived in Central Ohio.

He was born in in northwest Ohio and moved to the Columbus area with his family when most of his tribe was displaced to Kansas and later to Oklahoma. Treaty between the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot, and Potawatomi Indians 11/17/ Print. Add to Favorites: Add Add all page(s) of this document to.

STAYEGHTHA (Stiahta, Tey-yagh-taw, Ustaiechta, Roundhead), Wyandot war chief; b. mid 18th century; d. in the Detroit River region. There was a Wyandot village called Roundhead’s Town Potawatomi, Ohio) on the upper Scioto River at the beginning of the 19th century, but at the time Roundhead appears most prominently in the historical record he lived in the Detroit.

Ratified treaty no. 56, treaty of Novemwith the Chippewa, Ottawa, Potawatomi, Wyandot, and Shawnee Indians. For a list of documents relating to this treaty see special list no. 6 (Novem ).

This document, also known as the Treaty of Detroit, was signed on Novemby William Hull, governor of the territory of Michigan, and the chiefs, sachems, and warriors of four Indian tribes, the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot, and Potawatomi.

Under its terms, the tribes ceded to the United States a tract of land comprising roughly the southeast quarter of the. The French Colony at Fort Stephenson During the War of Francis “Hutro” Navarre Emerges from the Shadows The Official Ohio Lands Book (Columbus, OH: The Crawford Co.

State Printers, ), vol. 15, ; Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, “An Ethnohistorical Report on the Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ottawa, and Chippewa of Northwest Ohio. Between andthe United States government and indigenous peoples of the Iroquois League and Wyandot, Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomi nations signed nine treaties covering the tri-county Author: Nathan Petch.

An ethnohistorical report (on the Wyandot, Ottawa, Chippewa, Munsee, Delaware, Shawnee, and Potawatomi of Royce areas 53 and 54) / [by] E. Wheeler-Voegelin. [Repr.] -- The location of Indian tribes in southeastern Michigan and northern Ohio / [by] H.H. Tanner. Some claims identify Okemos as the nephew of Chief Pontiac.

He supposedly led a mixed band of Ottawa, Chippewa and Potawatomi Indians in war, including battles in the s, the Border Wars and the War of One account has him fighting in the Battle of the Thames in Ohio, where Tecumseh was : Erik Ponder.

Guest blogger Patrick M. Tucker sheds further light on the role of the Navarre family on the Battle of Frenchtown and its aftermath. This article originally appeared in Northwest Ohio History, vol.

83, no. 1 (Autumn ). Munsee, Seneca, and Shawnee. This report is a careful study of a fascinating and historically important area. Indians of Northern Ohio and Southeast Michigan contains Wheeler-Voegelin's report on Royce areas 53 and 54 and Helen Tanner's report on the location of Indian groups in this region between and The Wyandot.

Odawa: | | Odawa | | | ||| | Denn World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive collection.

July 4, Proclaimed Ap A treaty between the United States of America, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriers of the Wyandot, Ottawa, Chipawa, Munsee and Delaware, Shawanee, and Pottawatima nations, holden at Fort Industry, on the Miami of the lake, on the fourth day of July, Anno Domini, one thousand eight hundred and five.

At the same time, representatives of the Chippewa, Ottawa, Potawatomi, and Wyandot traveled to the Cumberland River valley to council with the Cherokee about joining them in an all out war against the United States.

The American Revolution ended on September 3, with the signing of the Treaty of Paris. Inthe Ojibwe joined three other tribes, the Odawa, Potawatomi and Wyandot people, in signing the Treaty of Detroit. The agreement, between the tribes and William Hull, representing the Michigan Territory, gave the United States a portion of today's Southeastern Michigan and a section of Ohio near the Maumee River.

Ohio History Central article on the Chippewa Indians. Densmore, Frances and Smithsonian Institution. Chippewa Customs. FHL Film item 1. Danziger, Edmund Jefferson. The Chippewas of Lake Superior.

Norman, OK. University of OK. FHL Book Cda. Blackbird, Andrew J. History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan.

The Ottawa Indians resided on Manitoulin Island in Lake Huron, according to the earliest historic records. They became particularly important as middlemen in the fur trade between other Indians and the French.

Later, they spread into southern Michigan and Ontario and northern Ohio. They established Ottawa Town on the east bank of the Cuyahoga River in Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. Also present are nine items related to Native American relations, including formal letters to the Chippewa, Delaware, Miami, Ottawa, Potawatomi, Shawnee, and Wyandot tribes, from Superintendent of Indian Affairs Richard Butler, Northern Territory Governor Arthur St.

Clair, and Secretary of War James McHenry. The Treaty of Greenville, ending the warfare, was signed in August by Anthony Wayne and representatives of the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawnee, Ottawa, Chippewa, Potawatomi, Miami, Eel River, Wea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia people.

The treaty established a line, shown on the adjacent map, forming the southern boundary of the land set aside for the Indians. At the same time, representatives of the Wyandot, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi traveled to the Cumberland River valley to council with the Cherokee about joining them in an all-out war against the United States.

The American Revolution ended on September 3,with the signing of the Treaty of Paris. The Odawa (also Ottawa or Odaawaa / oʊ ˈ d ɑː w ə /), said to mean "traders", are an Indigenous American ethnic group who primarily inhabit land in the Eastern Woodlands region, commonly known as the northern United States and southern have long had territory that crosses the current border between the two countries, and they are federally recognized as.

- Wyandot Tribe towns map in Ohio - Indian Wyandot - Google Search. - Wyandot Tribe towns map in Ohio - Indian Wyandot - Google Search. The Ottawa, Potawatomi, and Ojibway of Michigan by James Clifton excellent text-pics Native American Home Etiquette - the Gathering - Go Blue Rid.- Native American Home.

(undated) Includes note on "Black Padoucas" (Bowles, () quoted by Bowen, Note on the Illinois, Ottawa, Chippewa and Potawatomi, and the Miami,-purchase of land by the U.

Notes on Civil War, etc. Bibliographic notes from "Arthur, John Preston. Indians of Northeastern Illinois: Anthropological report on the Chippewa, Ottawa, & Potawatomi Indians in northeastern Illinois & The Identity of the Mascoutens (American Indian Ethnohistory) [David Albert Baerreis, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, Remedios Wycoco-Moore, Indian Claims Commission] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : David Albert Baerreis, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, Remedios Wycoco-Moore.

Title: People of the three fires: the Ottawa, Potawatomi and Ojibway of Michigan (Book, ) [] Created Date: 4/16/ PMFile Size: KB.

The Treaty of Detroit was a treaty between the United States and the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot and Potawatomi Native American nations.

The treaty was signed at Detroit, Michigan on Novemwith William Hull, governor of the Michigan Territory and superintendent of Indian affairs, the sole representative of the U.S.

^ "Treaty Between the Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot, and Potawatomi Indians". World Digital Library. Retrieved ^ "Ojibwe Culture", Milwaukee Public Museum, accessed 10 December ^ Daniel E. Moerman (). Native American Medicinal Plants: An Ethnobotanical Dictionary. Timber Press.

52– Residents named the town, which was founded inin honor of the Ottawa Indians, who once had a village at the site of modern-day Ottawa. Samuel de Champlain Champlain also discovered the lake named for him (Lake Champlain, on the border of northern New York state and Vermont, named in ) and was important in establishing and.

TREATIES WITH AMERICAN INDIANS Table of Contents Volume I Thematic Essays Governments and Treaty Making Indian Treaty Making Process: A Native View Federal Policy and Treaty Making: A Federal View Legislation, Treaty Substitutes, and Indian Treaties Relevant Court Cases Related to Treaties Indian Treaties as International Agreements Historical Periods.

The treaty was signed by 11 Ottawa chiefs and 9 Chippewa chiefs, including (Ottawa chiefs) Shawanoe, Oninjuega or Wing, Ceddimalmese or Black Hawk, and (Chippewa chief) Kenojekum or Pike. The doctrine of “Manifest Destiny” was the rule governments used to say they were doing the right thing, in taking over the lands of the Indians.

The Wyandot people or Wendat, also called the Huron Nation and Huron people, are an Iroquoian-speaking peoples of North America who emerged as a tribe around the north shore of Lake Ontario.

[citation needed] They traditionally spoke the Wyandot language, a Northern Iroquoian language, and were believed to number o at the time of European .Wyandot County Historical Society, Upper Sandusky, OH. likes. The museum is currently closed for walk-in tours during the winter season.

We /5(4).The Odawa (also Ottawa or Odaawaa /oʊˈdɒwə/), said to mean "traders", are an Indigenous American ethnic group who primarily inhabit land in the northern United States and southern Canada.

They have long had territory that crosses the current border between the two countries, and they are federally recognized as Native American tribes in the United States and have .